Afrikan Martial Arts Institute

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AFRIKAN MARTIAL ARTS:
Ancient Principles for Today’s Warrior

By Balogun Ojetade

Every tribe, or nation, in Afrika has its own complex and complete martial arts systems.  In whatever language they speak, Afrikans, traditionally, refer to their martial arts simply as “wrestling”.  The Afrikan concept of wrestling, however, is quite different from the Asian or Western concept of wrestling.

In the Afrikan martial arts, to “wrestle” means to put your opponent on his back, belly, or side in order to render him more vulnerable to a finishing technique.  This goal can be achieved by any means: strikes, throws, sweeps, joint-locks, or weapon attacks.  Thus, if you hit your opponent in the head with a club and he falls from the force of the blow, you have – by Afrikan standards – wrestled him.

How did it come to pass that the martial arts throughout the continent of Afrika would adopt this concept?  For the answer, let’s look at a story about the Yoruba prophet and master wrestler, Orunmila: Orunmila, who, among other things, was an undefeatable wrestler, traveled the continent of Afrika, teaching and studying spiritual, sociological and martial traditions.  Everywhere Orunmila went, he wrestled with – and defeated – the greatest fighters on the continent.  Orunmila would pick up a throwing technique in one village; a weapon disarm in another.  Orunmila’s opponents would ask him to teach them the techniques he defeated them with and he would teach them, which is in accord with Afrikan customs.  Eventually, the martial arts of Afrika began to possess a similar rhythm and to follow the same underlying wrestling strategy.

Another story, which teaches the tenets of Afrikan wrestling, is as follows:

There was a boy named Omobe (“rascal”, “troublesome child”) that had great physical ability and was trained to be a wrestler. As he grew older his wrestling abilities grew stronger and before long he was considered the greatest wrestler in the world. At his birth the local priest/diviner warned his parents to not allow Omobe to climb palm trees. But one day while his parents were away he decided to climb a palm tree any way. From high up he could peer into the spirit world and he noticed that several divinities had gathered for a fantastic wrestling match! Omobe immediately climbed down and made his way to the spirit world to test his own luck amongst a variety of spirits. He beat every opponent: Egungun (ancestors), Oriṣa (Forces of Nature) and all others lost at his hands. Finally he prepared to wrestle Olokun. While he summoned all of his physical strength, Olokun drew on her spiritual powers.


During the match Omobe attempted to throw Olokun to the ground, but instead Olokun ended up firmly attached to Omobe’s head. All attempts at removing Olokun from his head failed and Olokun declared Omobe’s head her permanent abode as a sign of Omobe’s arrogance and disrespect towards the other spirits. When Omobe returned home the local priest/diviner advised him to appease Olokun or die. So for seven days Omobe made sacrifice. On the last day Omobe was initiated as the first Olokun priest. After Omobe’s initiation into the priesthood, Olokun loosened her grip on Omobe’s life.

Amongst Afrikan traditionalists, the palm tree represents the ancestors and the elders.  Omobe climbed a palm tree even though he was not supposed to, which means he learned the higher levels of wrestling technique – and gained the ase (power) of the wrestler – through crafty means and then abandoned his teachers (he climbed down from the tree) and used what he had learned to fight those who taught him.  This act of arrogance and disrespect led him to fight against the Forces of Nature, themselves.  Finally, Olokun, the spirit of unfathomable wisdom and matron spirit of the descendants of Afrikans who were taken captive during the Transatlantic Slave Trade, defeated Omobe. This means, though Omobe had mastered the physical aspect of wrestling, his disrespect of – and disconnection from – the community and its spiritual support prevented him from learning the deeper wisdom found within the study and training of the martial arts.

It was not until Omobe devoted himself to the attaining of deep wisdom and respect for the Afrikan traditions as an Olokun priest, that he was able to save himself from an early death.

This story teaches us that in order to learn the depths of wisdom found in the Afrikan martial arts, reverence of one’s ancestors, respect for one’s elders and adherence to tradition is paramount.

Furthermore, the “deep wisdom” Omobe had to learn in order to redeem himself and to save his life, was the wisdom rooted in respect for, and understanding of, the “Aje”, which is the primal power of the female principle.

It was Olokun, a female Force of Nature, who defeated Omobe and threatened to take his life until Omobe became her priest.  Omobe was socialized by Olokun, which is in accord with Aje’s function as a biological, physical and spiritual force of creativity and social and political enforcement.

War, defense and anything associated with Ogun, the Warrior Spirit of the Yoruba, is also associated with Aje.

It is recognition of – and respect for – the power of the female that gives the Afrikan warrior the authority to defend and to take life.  An illustration of this is the application of martial arts technique.  In the Afrikan martial arts, we say “Footwork drives the technique”.  Footwork, or the Element of Air in Afrikan martial arts, is female.  It is the power of the female, manifested in footwork, which allows us to effectively apply our martial arts techniques.

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THE FIVE PRINCIPLES

The martial arts of Afrika follow Five Basic Principles, which are the principles that govern traditional Afrikan life:

THE FOUR ELEMENTS

In Afrikan societies, there are four elements, which are considered the vital materials found in every living creature on Earth.  These four elements are:

Earth – The element of Earth represents the stances in the Afrikan martial arts.  Within the Earth Element are Three Foundations:

·       WoodHigh, narrow stances. Wood stances are extremely mobile and are used for fast, upright fighting and self-defense.

·       Stone – Low, wide stances. Stone stances are extremely stable and are used for grappling and for fighting with a weapon.

·       Metal – Low, narrow stances.  Metal stances are extremely malleable and are used for grappling and ground-fighting.

Air – The element of Air represents the footwork and movements in the Afrikan martial arts.  A practitioner of the Afrikan martial arts can move like a gentle breeze, a gale wind, or a whirlwind.

Fire – The element of Fire represents the masculine energy and techniques in the Afrikan martial arts.  Fire techniques are forceful, penetrating and explosive.

Water – The element of Water represents the feminine energy and techniques in the Afrikan martial arts.  Water techniques are yielding, encircling and deceptively powerful.

POLYRHYTHMIC APPLICATION

Like the Afrikan drum, the techniques in the Afrikan martial arts are polyrhythmic; meaning a practitioner of the Afrikan martial arts seeks to touch his opponent in two or more places at once.  An offense and a defense are usually applied simultaneously, or the offense
is the defense.

THE UNBROKEN CIRCLE

The principle of The Unbroken Circle is also referred to as “Call and Response”.  A practitioner of the Afrikan martial arts seeks to blend with, and adapt to, the actions and rhythms of his partner or opponent, creating a never ending circle.  A practitioner of the Afrikan martial arts does not meet force with force, but rather takes his opponent’s force and uses it against him.

THE WIND HAS ONE NAME

The Afrikan martial arts simplify self-defense by dealing not with a specific attack, but with the
angle of the attack.  The Afrikan martial arts recognize that there are only fifteen angles an opponent can attack from, so instead of being concerned with the infinite variations of attacks, the Afrikan martial arts deal with finite angles.  The Afrikan martial arts further simplify combat by teaching that every block is a strike and every strike is a block.  Thus, when an Afrikan martial artist learns an offensive technique, he has, in effect learned a defensive technique.

WASTE NO PART OF THE ANIMAL

The Afrikan martial arts stress economy of motion.  The idea is: “If it’s there, use it.”  Thus, if you strike an assailant in the chin with an uppercut, you should continue that upward motion and hit him in the throat with an upward elbow, because after the punch, your elbow is in perfect position to strike your opponent.

EGBE OGUN

We have looked at the strategy of wrestling, as well as the Five Basic Principles, both of which are inherent in the Afrikan martial arts.  Now, let’s examine Egbe Ogun, a comprehensive, synergistic system of the Afrikan martial arts, which is growing increasingly popular in the United States due to its efficient and effective techniques and the dynamic teaching methods of its instructors.

Let’s first look at the meaning of the phrase “Egbe Ogun”:

“EGBE”

In the lands of the Yoruba speaking people of Afrika – which encompasses Western Nigeria, as well as parts of Togo and Benin – each city and town has a number of societies called “egbe”.   Each egbe preserves the wisdom and technology of various social and ceremonial functions within the community.  Each egbe also serves as a craft guild and is closely associated with a force of nature.   Farmers belong to Egbe Orisa Oko; market women belong to Egbe Oya; woodcarvers, blacksmiths, surgeons, barbers, hunters, warriors and those who facilitate male passage rites belong to Egbe Ogun.

The Yoruba word for the physical heart – the organ that regulates the flow of blood through the body – is called “okan”,  In traditional Afrikan societies, there is a basic concept that what appears in the physical world is always supported by its counterpart in the spiritual world.  It is believed that within the okan is a spiritual heart, or power center, which regulates the flow of emotions.  This spiritual heart is called “egbe”.

The word egbe is also translated as “society” or “collective”.  In this context, the meaning is similar to the English expression: “the heart of the group”.

The dual meaning of the word egbe suggests that the spiritual force that supports the heart of an individual also supports the hearts of the community.

In Egbe Ogun, students are taught to draw spiritual power – which is regulated by the egbe – into the body through various power centers that control the constant flow of energy between self and world.  These power centers are called “awuje”.  The awuje draw on a form of energy called “ase”, which is the dynamic energy that brings Creation into being.

“OGUN”

“Ogun” is the Yoruba word used to describe the forces of nature that have the unique function of removing all obstacles that block the path of physical, mental and spiritual evolution.  These forces – Ogun – are regarded as the Warrior Spirit.  It is the function of Ogun, as a warrior, to clear away the obstacles that exist along the road towards attaining balanced character (iwa rere).  In Egbe Ogun, it is understood that these obstacles may be either internal or external.

Ogun represents aggression, which is an integral part of the dynamics of nature.  This aggression is linked to the will to survive, which exists in all species on Earth.

As part of the socialization process, the aggression associated with the Warrior Spirit remains a necessary aspect of survival.

This socialization process is based on the relationship between the forces of nature called Ogun and the forces of nature called “Obatala”, the spirit of peace, laughter, patience, intelligence, cleanliness and morality.  It is the function of Obatala to determine when and how the Warrior Spirit is to manifest.  Those warriors who maintain their martial arts discipline learn to access – and to suppress – the powers represented by Ogun.  The dynamic, aggressive element of Ogun is kept in balance by the principles of justice and equality.

“EGBE OGUN”

We have examined the concept of “Egbe” and the concept of “Ogun”.  Now let’s look deeper into the synergy of these two concepts, manifested as the martial art Egbe Ogun.

In Yorubaland, the word “Ijala”, on one level, means “warrior”.  “Ijala” is a contraction of the word “ija”, which means “to fight” and the word “ala”, which means “White Cloth”.  The symbol of the white cloth is associated with Obatala, which means “King of the White Cloth”.  One of the functions of Obatala is to maintain ethical standards within society.  The word “Ijala” suggests that the essence of the warrior is aligned with moral principles and the ideals that are at the foundation of spiritual transformation.

Ijala are also the poems chanted by Warriors in honor of Ogun.  These poems (Ijala Ogun) are the source of today’s rap and hip-hop movement.

On a deeper level, Ijala translates to mean “warrior skills guided by White Cloth”.  This indicates that the Forces in nature that guide life on Earth form the foundation of the fighting techniques in Egbe Ogun.

In Egbe Ogun, Warriors learn to connect to the inner self (“Ori Inu”).  It is through this connection that the student of Egbe Ogun can invoke the forces that give added power (ase) to acquired – and inherent – fighting skills.

The integration of ase (power) and iwa rere (balanced character) is the responsibility and goal of every Afrikan Warrior.  It is said of those who achieve this state of oneness with power and character (Ogun and Obatala):  “Ijalagun molu”, or “Those who integrate the power of Ogun and Obatala never lose.”

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Check out the new Recoil Magazine

Recoil
Be sure to check out this new issue of Recoil magazine. This magazine is a testament to the growing number of people who are aware of the necessity to be prepared for a survival situation and find themselves living off the grid. And this is the type of reading material black people need to be reading. When things get really bad(Martial law,economic crash,natural disaster) black people will get hit the hardest.It is quickly apparent that OFFGRID is brought to you by the same folks as RECOIL, the popular and certainly controversial firearms publication that is big on style.
There are plenty of Survival, Prepper, SHTF,Apocalypse and different forums, books, television shows, and other media out there to plan your big escape from civilization. However, I was excited to see a magazine that could draw mainstream appeal with a clean modern aesthetic with big pretty pictures and plenty of professional content to inform the masses. Just as you would expect from a premier issue of a survival preparation information magazine, OFFGRID Starts with the basics. You will find a wide range of topics covered from all types of gear and food needed, first aid, along with information pieces on simple staples like paracord. They didn’t stop there as they delve into more advanced topics like sourcing alternative fuels and different options for water purification beyond a filter.
This issue covers topics ranging from:

•Knot Tying
•Bug Out Bags
•Different types of Paracord
•MRE Reviews
•Prepping from your local Wal-Mart, CVS, or convenience store
•First Aid Kit reviews as well as building your own
•Blow Out Kit Reviews
• Weapon Selection
•Water Purification
Off Grid
A Buyers Guide was provided for Multitools and they even fit in coverage of firearms to utilize for self defense with contribution provided by Kyle Lamb and Stickman. Overall I was impressed with the depth of information although I thought the $9 price was a little steep. This magazine has some great information that our people can really use.

Does this sound Familiar? It should.

NDAA

Americans might once again be guaranteed the right to trial: a clause in the most recent draft of next year’s defense spending bill ensures that United States citizens aren’t stripped of their right to habeas corpus.
Lawmakers have included provisions in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 tha

t relieves those worried with how last year’s bill allows for the indefinite detention of Americans without trial.
Under the 2012 NDAA, any person considered a substantial supporter of a group alleged to have committed hostilities against the US can be held in a military prison until essentially the end of time without ever being brought to court. In the latest draft of next year’s NDAA, Congress is reminded of the writ of habeas corpus and told any legal American resident must be awarded a fair trial.

“Nothing in the Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public Law 107-40; 50 U.S.C. 1541 note) or the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-81) shall be construed to deny the availability of the writ of habeas corpus or to deny any Constitutional rights in a court ordained or established by or under Article III of the Constitution for any person who is lawfully in the United States when detained pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public Law 107-40; 50 U.S.C. 1541 note) and who is otherwise entitled to the availability of such writ or such rights,” reads Sec 1033 (a) of the proposed Pentagon spending bill.

Elsewhere, the NDAA draft orders that the president must inform Congress within two days of any American detained under the Authorization for Use of Military Force, a post-9/11 legislation that the Obama White House has used to defend their supposed right to keep indefinite detention on the books. A team of plaintiffs led by journalist Chris Hedges have sued US Pres. Barack Obama for implementing the 2012 NDAA and its indefinite detention provisions, but the fight has been stalled by an appellate ruling that removed an injunction from District Judge Katherine Forrest that blocked those sections.

“If the Obama administration simply appealed it, as we expected, it would have raised this red flag,” Hedges wrote on Reddit in September. “But since they were so aggressive it means that once Judge Forrest declared the law invalid, if they were using it, as we expect, they could be held in contempt of court. This was quite disturbing, for it means, I suspect, that US citizens, probably dual nationals, are being held in military detention facilities almost certainly overseas and maybe at home.”

By way of a fight spearheaded by Hedges and a massive grassroots campaign, efforts to remove the indefinite detention provision from US law now seems to stand a chance at being successful. That isn’t to say a fair and speedy trial will necessarily be without obstacles, though. The 2013 NDAA still needs to pass the Senate and be signed into law by the president, and there is ample time for anyone in Washington to strike the latest provision or add new ones ensuring indefinite detention remains a possibility. Last year, Pres. Obama’s top aides said the White House would not sign off on the NDAA until the indefinite detention clauses were removed. On New Year’s Eve, Pres. Obama authorized it regardless with little comment to the press aside from a signing statement acknowledging he had reservations about the very bill he just put on the books.

Sen. Carl Levin (D-Michigan), the chairman of the Senate Committee on Armed Services, has claimed that the indefinite detention provisions were insisted by the president himself.

Even if the latest copy stays intact, though, an US citizen held captive by his own country might not have it that easy. Sec 1033 (c) reads, “A person who is lawfully in the United States when detained pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force shall be allowed to file an application for habeas corpus relief in an appropriate district court not later than 30 days after the date on which such person is placed in military custody,” perhaps paving the way for a full month of mistreatment at the hands of Uncle Sam.

Survival Categories

Considering how much damage was done in New York because of Hurricane Sandy, everyone should have a safe place to go and be ready – for ‘anything’ and ‘everything’.  Obviously, with tornadoes, you can’t keep your supplies on the first floor, but basement areas seem to be okay – storm cellars are always a good idea. Of course we all remember what happened to black folks in Katrina,right? We don’t want that happening again. We can’t rely on FEMA to save us.So black people need to get ready for ANYTHING. Here’s a list of the different categories people usually fall into. What category best describes you?

SURVIVAL CATEGORIES

Working Citizen – Concerned with paying rent & utilities, keeping or getting health insurance, paying taxes, inflation, car repairs, leaky plumbing, back pains… May work two jobs, does without personal luxuries, hopes their children will do better than themselves. Emotional, physical and financial survival is the focus of daily life.

Upwardly Mobile – Concerned about aging, retirement investments, cholesterol levels, loss of employment, lawsuits, burglaries, bandwidth, clothes dryer lint fires. Takes vitamins, exercises, eats oatmeal, wears seatbelts, has smoke & carbon-monoxide detectors, requests medical tests, has numerous insurance policies, files lawsuits, pampers themselves wherever ,whenever possible. “Survival” to them means living long enough to take full benefit of extensive retirement plans and long term care insurance policies.

Medical Crisis – Has very complete medical pack in house and in car. Donates blood and is active in the Red Cross. Has taken paramedic EMT & CPR courses, knows vital signs, stockpiles medicines, etc. Concerned with vehicle accidents and emergencies involving injuries. Focus is on helping family, friends & community survive medical emergencies.

Safety Preparedness – Learns principles and techniques needed for surviving worse-case scenarios that can occur anyplace, anywhere. Makes preparations for such common calamities as building fires, dog attacks, physical confrontations, lightning strikes, car breakdowns, third-world travel problems, flash floods, home invasions and even train wrecks. Reads: Survive Safely Anywhere, Worse-Case Scenario Handbooks

Wilderness Survival – Being able to stay alive for indefinite periods in life threatening wilderness scenarios. These can include: plane crashes, shipwrecks, being lost in the woods. Concerns are: thirst, hunger, climate, terrain, health, stress, fear. Prepares with: knowledge, training & practice. Kit includes: water purifiers, shelter, fire starters, clothing, food, medical supplies, navigation & signaling gear. Reads: Nessmuk, Kephart, Angier, Mears

Personal Assault Survival – Individuals concerned with surviving brief encounters of violent activity. Focus is on personal protection & it’s legal ramifications, danger awareness, Boyd’s cycle (also known as the OODA cycle – observe, orient, decide & act), martial arts, self defense tactics and tools (both lethal & less-than-lethal). Reads: Ayoob, Cooper, Jordan, Applegate, Sanow, Marshall, Taylor, Steele, Sun Tzu

Natural Disaster, Brief – People that live in tornado, hurricane, flood, wildfire, earthquake or heavy snowfall areas and want to be prepared for the inevitable. Investment in material for fortifying structures and tools for rebuilding & constructing temporary shelter, perhaps have a below ground shelter, food, water, medicine, and supplies, enough to get by until contact with the rest of the world resumes.

Natural Disaster, Years Long – Concerned about long term weather cycles of 2-10 years, unusually cold or warm periods, that have happened on and off for thousands of years. Might stock several tons of food per family member and have a heavy duty greenhouse with packed in nitrogen non-hybrid seeds.

Natural Disaster, Lifelong – Possible scenarios include: severe global warming and the coming ice age, the greenhouse-effect-gone-wild, warming/cooling of gulf steam waters, large meteor strike, shift in earth’s axis or reversal of geo-magnetic fields… Owns maps of previous ice age glacier patterns and are hopeful they live south of the permafrost line. May have purchased snowshoes. Reads reports by National Academy of Science and Woods Hole Physical Oceanography Dept.

General Social/Political Decline, Liberal – Concerned about growing cultural problems and the slow destruction of the constitution & the bill of rights. Into anti-crime measures, both passive (alarms) and active (neighborhood watch). Most often anti-gun, pro-choice, pro-environment, anti- war, against prayer in school, against death penalty… Supporters of the ACLU, Amnesty International, Ban Handguns in America, Greenpeace.

General Social/Political Decline, Conservative – Concerned about growing cultural problems and the slow destruction of the constitution & the bill of rights. Into anti-crime measures, both passive (alarms) and active (Rottweilers & guns). Most often pro-gun, anti-abortion, pro-business, pro- national defense, for prayer in school, pro-death penalty… Supporters of Attorney General Ashcroft, Rush Limbaugh, NRA, the Alaska “Support Industry” Alliance.

Cold War “Survivalists” – Fear homeland invasion by nation’s enemies, whether foreign or domestic. This was a group of substantial size before the fall of the Soviet Union. True-believers currently suspect the U.N. of one-world domination plans and fear black helicopters, government intervention & taxation. The majority of these people have relocated to other groups. Favorite movies: Red Dawn, Mad Max trilogy.

Nuclear War – These folks know all primary, secondary & tertiary targets, downwind fallout patterns and chose to live in locales they deem to be safest in the event of all out nuclear war. They’ve built fallout shelters and have the necessary food, water, tools and skills to see them though. Other groups also prepare for nuclear war as an exercise, in that if you are prepared for nuclear war, you are prepared for all other scenarios. Reads: Tappan, Kearny, Clayton.

Bio-Chem – Concerned with the spread of fatal diseases and terrorist use of biological agents & nerve gases. Examples: E.Coli 0157, botulism, dengue, Cruetzfeldt-Jakob Disease, SARS, Rabies, Hantavirus, Anthrax, Plague, Cholera, HIV, Ebola, Marburg, Lassa, Saron, VX … Might own NBC (nuclear, biological & chemical) full-face respirators, polyethylene coveralls, PVC boots, Nitrile gloves, plastic sheeting and duct tape. Reads: CDC reports, Haz-Mat manuals, Preston’s “Hot Zone”

Knowledge-Enabled Mass Destruction (KMD) – Concerned with unintended consequences of genetic manipulation, nano-technology, transgenic crops, psychological engineering, genome hybridized cloning, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, engineered organisms, self-replicating molecular robotic assemblers (“gray goo problem”)… Techno-luddites fear human extinction. At the other end are the bioethicists who believe policies and self regulation will avert disaster. Reads: Kurzweil, Kaczynski, Moravec, Dyson

Over-Population – Soaring increase in world’s uncontrolled human growth impacts available freshwater, food, health-care, environment, economics, consumerism, spread of diseases and just about every other facet of life.  projections indicate that world population of 6.2 billion may again double in fifty years. Followers range from those who’ve foregone children & have had voluntary sterilization to those who’ve embrace large families and only then sound the alarm, like Al Gore, David Packard (H-P founder) and Sripati Chandrasekhar (India’s birth control advocate). Supports: Family planning, birth control and voluntary sterilization.

Monetary Disaster – Reads lots of Ayn Rand and believe the Federal Reserve system is evil. Newsletters suggest hard assets of gold & silver bullion/coin and similar precious-metal oriented investments. They are preparing for paper money to become worthless, thus have a good burglar alarm system and enough food/ supplies to last a couple of months, or perhaps even a year, until a new monetary system (formal or informal) is re-established.

Biblical Revelations – The Savior is going to return very soon, the final battle with the devil will occur in their lifetime, the rapture is eminent. Very wide range of beliefs and attitudes in this group. Pacifist to armed camp, no food stockpiles (leave that to God) to decades of food storage, etc. The ability to put trust in faith, above all else, is essential to members of this group. Usually follow one very charismatic leader’s interpretations of the bible.

Post-9/11 Reactionaries – Are convinced that government should have unlimited powers to do everything and anything to stop all potential terrorist threats. They want greater protection through increased governmental controls over citizens and foreigners alike, both within the country’s borders and elsewhere. Willing to preemptively strike the enemy. Willing to surrender civil liberties and human rights in order to feel safe and secure. Believers rarely take any personal action, relying instead on the government to make changes.

Executive Order(read carefully)- Barack Obama

EXECUTIVE ORDER

– – – – – – –
ESTABLISHING THE WHITE HOUSE
HOMELAND SECURITY PARTNERSHIP COUNCIL
October 26 2012
By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to advance the Federal Government’s use of local partnerships to address homeland security challenges, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. The purpose of this order is to maximize the Federal Government’s ability to develop local partnerships in the United States to support homeland security priorities. Partnerships are collaborative working relationships in which the goals, structure, and roles and responsibilities of the relationships are mutually determined. Collaboration enables the Federal Government and its partners to use resources more efficiently, build on one another’s expertise, drive innovation, engage in collective action, broaden investments to achieve shared goals, and improve performance. Partnerships enhance our ability to address homeland security priorities, from responding to natural disasters to preventing terrorism, by utilizing diverse perspectives, skills, tools, and resources.
The National Security Strategy emphasizes the importance of partnerships, underscoring that to keep our Nation safe “we must tap the ingenuity outside government through strategic partnerships with the private sector, nongovernmental organizations, foundations, and community-based organizations. Such partnerships are critical to U.S. success at home and abroad, and we will support them through enhanced opportunities for engagement, coordination, transparency, and information sharing.” This approach recognizes that, given the complexities and range of challenges, we must institutionalize an all-of-Nation effort to address the evolving threats to the United States.
Sec. 2. White House Homeland Security Partnership Council and Steering Committee.
(a) White House Homeland Security Partnership Council. There is established a White House Homeland Security Partnership Council (Council) to foster local partnerships — between the Federal Government and the private sector, nongovernmental organizations, foundations, community-based organizations, and State, local, tribal, and territorial government and law enforcement — to address homeland security challenges. The Council shall be chaired by the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism (Chair), or a designee from the National Security Staff.
(b) Council Membership.
(i) Pursuant to the nomination process established in subsection (b)(ii) of this section, the Council shall be composed of Federal officials who are from field offices of the executive departments, agencies, and bureaus (agencies) that are members of the Steering Committee established in subsection (c) of this section, and who have demonstrated an ability to develop, sustain, and institutionalize local partnerships to address policy priorities.
(ii) The nomination process and selection criteria for members of the Council shall be established by the Steering Committee. Based on those criteria, agency heads may select and present to the Steering Committee their nominee or nominees to represent them on the Council. The Steering Committee shall consider all of the nominees and decide by consensus which of the nominees shall participate on the Council. Each member agency on the Steering Committee, with the exception of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, may have at least one representative on the Council.
(c) Steering Committee. There is also established a Steering Committee, chaired by the Chair of the Council, to provide guidance to the Council and perform other functions as set forth in this order. The Steering Committee shall include a representative at the Deputy agency head level, or that representative’s designee, from the following agencies:
(i) Department of State;
(ii) Department of the Treasury;
(iii) Department of Defense;
(iv) Department of Justice;
(v) Department of the Interior;
(vi) Department of Agriculture;
(vii) Department of Commerce;
(viii) Department of Labor;
(ix) Department of Health and Human Services;
(x) Department of Housing and Urban Development;
(xi) Department of Transportation;
(xii) Department of Energy;
(xiii) Department of Education;
(xiv) Department of Veterans Affairs;
(xv) Department of Homeland Security;
(xvi) Office of the Director of National Intelligence;
(xvii) Environmental Protection Agency;
(xviii) Small Business Administration; and
(xix) Federal Bureau of Investigation.
At the invitation of the Chair, representatives of agencies not listed in subsection (c) of this section or other executive branch entities may attend and participate in Steering Committee meetings as appropriate.
(d) Administration. The Chair or a designee shall convene meetings of the Council and Steering Committee, determine their agendas, and coordinate their work. The Council may establish subgroups consisting exclusively of Council members or their designees, as appropriate.
Sec. 3. Mission and Function of the Council and Steering Committee. (a) The Council shall, consistent with guidance from the Steering Committee:
(i) advise the Chair and Steering Committee members on priorities, challenges, and opportunities for local partnerships to support homeland security priorities, as well as regularly report to the Steering Committee on the Council’s efforts;
(ii) promote homeland security priorities and opportunities for collaboration between Federal Government field offices and State, local, tribal, and territorial stakeholders;
(iii) advise and confer with State, local, tribal, and territorial stakeholders and agencies interested in expanding or building local homeland security partnerships;
(iv) raise awareness of local partnership best practices that can support homeland security priorities;
(v) as appropriate, conduct outreach to representatives of the private sector, nongovernmental organizations, foundations, community-based organizations, and State, local, tribal, and territorial government and law enforcement entities with relevant expertise for local homeland security partnerships, and collaborate with other Federal Government bodies; and
(vi) convene an annual meeting to exchange key findings, progress, and best practices.
(b) The Steering Committee shall:
(i) determine the scope of issue areas the Council will address and its operating protocols, in consultation with the Office of Management and Budget;
(ii) establish the nomination process and selection criteria for members of the Council as set forth in section 2(b)(ii) of this order;
(iii) provide guidance to the Council on the activities set forth in subsection (a) of this section; and
(iv) within 1 year of the selection of the Council members, and annually thereafter, provide a report on the work of the Council to the President through the Chair.
Sec. 4. General Provisions. (a) The heads of agencies participating in the Steering Committee shall assist and provide information to the Council, consistent with applicable law, as may be necessary to implement this order. Each agency shall bear its own expense for participating in the Council.
(b) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:
(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department, agency, or the head thereof;
(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals; or
(iii) the functions of the Overseas Security Advisory Council.
(c) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and appropriate protections for privacy and civil liberties, and subject to the availability of appropriations.
(d) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.
BARACK OBAMA
THE WHITE HOUSE,
October 26, 2012.

Things you may need for Long Term Survival

In light of Hurricane Sandy I thought this post would be very fitting. You never know when something like that could happen in your neighborhood. And these bad storms have been increasing over the years. This got me to thinking about what a person would need to survive for a few days. Or what about a few months? Some people are saying we should prepare for at least 7 days, but the way things go after a hurricane, tornado, floods, loss of electricity and the fact that these disasters will continue and perhaps even get worse in coming years according to trends, one week is not enough.  Some have said 7 years, but that seems too long so do what you can.  Be sure to use the older stocked goods first and replace them with new.  Otherwise you will end up with all old food you might not even want to eat.  Always check canned tomatoes for spoilage, as even in the can they can spoil.  Most other foods last a long time.

1.  Water stored to last at least 7 days, at one gallon per day per person. (If you buy cases of l/2 litres – you can buy enough to last a couple of months)  Recently, people are saying that water in plastic is toxic, so store water in glass if possible.

     Homeland Security recommends 7 days for survival, but in recent years, some people don’t have electricity or heat for
up to 3 weeks, so to be really safe –  plan for at least 3 weeks.

2.  A good canteen and basins to catch rainwater. Also have a good supply of water purification tablets or bleach, or plan to boil your water. The surest way to purify water is to boil it for 15 to 20 minutes.

      Note:  I have received arguments that boiling for longer than 5 minutes will just waste good water, but 15 minutes is
safer to kill Cryptospiridium.

3.   Food, per person, for one year:   (Divide by 12 for 1 month)

     Wheat – 300 lbs.

      Rice – 100 lbs.

      Beans, Peas, Lentils, 50 lbs. each

      Honey or Sugar – 60 lbs.

      Salt – 3 lbs.  (Get 6 lbs to be sure) (See below)

      Cayenne Pepper – 1 large can

      Herbal Seasonings

      Dried Milk – 80 lbs.

      Peanut Butter – 50 lbs.

      Dried Fruit

      Canned food, or dried (ready to mix) food

      Oatmeal – 50 lbs.

      Alfalfa Seeds – 10 lbs.

      Sprouts (see below)

      Canned Sardines, tuna, salmon

If you have a baby, include formula and baby food.  If you have pets, you will want food for them as well.  Store food needs in waterproof containers, capable of also protecting against insects and mice. Use Steel garbage cans or plastic 5 gallon buckets. The vacuum sealed method is also very good. If you are storing nuts or oatmeal, they smell and taste bad after a while, so they will need to be rotated. For all storing of food, the rule is: use up the old and replace with the new.

Also, buy mice and rat traps and don’t forget to use them.

NOTE;  I recommend freezing nuts for storage.

4.  Manual grain grinder

5.  Medicines – Assemble a standard first aid kit, with a comprehensive first aid book. Also include things for headache, upset stomach, congestion, colds, such as Pepto Bismol, aspirin, Tylenol, Excedrin, disinfectants, prescription medicines; and anything else you use regularly. Include vitamins, apple cider vinegar, honey, garlic, sage tea for colds, mint tea, golden seal, brandy (good as medicine), herbal tinctures, hops, catnip (which helps you sleep), herbs for cooking, including dried garlic and onions, cayenne pepper, cumin, basil, and coriander and salt. After you’ve been eating rice and beans for a few days, they’ll need lots of help to make them taste good.  Add to this list things such as Colloid Silver, and perhaps even your own Colloid Silver maker. It isn’t expensive to make your own Colloid Silver.  Also don’t forget sunscreen – nobody is safe in the sun long-term anymore.

Also learn about herbal medicines and if you have space, grow some of your own – most are perennials and once you get the plant growing, its yours for as long as you take care of it. 

See:  http://www.earthmountainview.com for suggestions on herbs and growing your own food.

6.  Toothbrushes, baking soda or salt to brush with, a good supply of dental floss (which can be used for other things as well) and another items you need for good tooth care. Stay away from toothpaste that has fluoride in it or you will kill your brain over time.

7.  Extra eye glasses

8.  For a camp kitchen you need: camp stove with good supply of fuel (in wooded areas, all you need are rocks and a flat tin or grill), pots and pans, plates and bowls (unbreakable)  (you can use Army surplus camp kits)  cooking utensils, knife, forks, spoon, spatula, biodegradable dish soap, towels, bucket to carry water, dish pan, matches dipped in wax and stored in waterproof containers.

9.  A good tent, sleeping bag for each person, extra blankets, sleeping pads, and ground cloth – and another waterproof tarp to cover your camp gear.

10. Clothing – Have clothing for all weather. Include a good warm coat and sweaters,  hat for rain or shine, rain gear, a good pair of hiking boots that will take years to wear out, warm winter underwear, wool socks, summer socks (don’t wear socks with holes in them as they cause blisters) (learn to darn socks) work gloves, hats, and whatever else you need for warmth and protection.

11. Hunting equipment. Hunting might be necessary for survival in some situations. Be prepared both with equipment and knowledge of how to use the equipment. First choice of a gun is a .22 caliber rifle.  You can kill anything up to a deer with it. Purchase 500 rounds of .22 hollow point bullets.  If you are not a good marksman, then get a 30-30 or 30-06 and at least 200 shells. A shotgun comes in handy for shooting things flying or running.   The bow and arrow is still one of the best weapons.  You will have to practice, and of course, you can never run out of shells.  If you want to be unseen and unheard by unfriendly people, this would be a good idea.  Also, take  a compass with you.

12.  Fishing equipment. – Get basic equipment. Include assorted sized hooks, fish lines, sinkers, etc. Fishing takes time, but if you are moving toward long-term survival, time is something you may have plenty of.

13.  Wood stove. Get one with a secondary burn chamber. It uses less wood and creates less pollution. Get one with a flat top for cooking on.

14. Chain saw, extra gas and oil, spark plugs, chain, etc.

15. Bow saw and a tool to set the teeth with, extra blades.

16. Skill saw (for when you have electricity)

17. Axe, hatchet, files.

18. Spitting maul

19. Flashlights with extra batteries and bulbs; candles; propane, kerosene, or Coleman lantern with plenty of fuel, and extra wicks and mantles.

20. A good pocket knife and a sharpening stone.

21. Hammers, assorted nails, assorted screws, wrench set, pliers, wire cutters, screw drivers, pipe wrench, 200 feet of 1/4 inch nylon rope, duct tape.

22. Shovels, spades, hoes, and rakes with strong teeth

23. Charging system – wind, water, or solar  – to pump water and provide electricity

24. Backpack – Waterproof. If you are forced to relocate, it may be all that goes with you.

25. Compass.

26. Up-to-date maps of the area you want to live in. This will show you land and water away from human habitation.

27. A 4 wheel drive vehicle with all the proper tools for maintaining it. Extra parts.

28. Tire chains for snow.

29. Radio. Have more than one. electrical and battery operated. Get a crank operated one.  (See C. Crane company for this information)  You’ll want to know what’s going on in the outside world.

30. Soap for laundry and bathing.  Also learn how to make your own and have those supplies handy.

31. Natural insect repellent.

32. A mirror.  You’ll want to see yourself, but you can use it for signaling as well.

33. Extra toilet paper.  Also keep old newspapers and telephone directories for emergencies. (Hint: if you need to use old newspaper, crinkle it up and straighten it out several times first — it’s much softer!)

34. Female needs – (Use cloth pads you can wash)

35. Baby diapers. (Use cloth you can wash)  Older kids can go bare bottom when necessary. Indians used moss and grass when necessary.

36. A basic sewing kit (needles and threads)

37. Safety pins

38. Swiss Army knife

39. Bobby pins (you can work wonder with these)

40. Pencils and paper, maybe even a notebook for a diary.

41. Musical instruments (harmonica, flute, guitar) to lift the spirit

42. Crazy glue

43. Patch kit

In the survival sense, think warm clothing, think fleece.

Those fleece throws (the single blankets) are great gifts, roll up nice and compact and are very useful as blankets, capes, padding for sleeping on the ground, tablecloths or even hung up on a lean to  break the wind.

44. Lots of good books to read.

45. .22 ammunition – amount stored should be 5000 rounds, not 500. It is small, inexpensive, and can be used as barter material if need be.

46. .30-30/.30-06 – other calibers to seriously consider are the .308, .270, .243, .223, and 7.62×39. Many people, myself included can’t handle the recoil of a .30-06 (and I don’t like .30-30). There are more rifles chambered in the calibers I mentioned than I can list, and all are good. It all depends on what you can afford. The amount of ammo one should store should be a minimum 1000 rounds, not 200.

47. A sturdy, fixed blade hunting knife should always be include. You can find these from Buck, Gerber, SOG, Camillus, Uncle Henry, and many others. I prefer the Camillus Pilot/Survival or Marine Combat knives. These have been made under contract for the US military for about four decades and have stood the test of time. They are also inexpensive ($25 and $35 respectively) so if one is lost or happens to break, you don’t get as upset as you would should your Gerber BMF ($240) bite the dust.

48. Many people, myself included, have not been able to master the use of a sharpening stone. But with the use of a sharpening kit, such as those by Lansky, we can bring up a very sharp edge on our knives.  Great for use on kitchen cutlery as well.

49. A pocket tool, such as those by Leatherman, Gerber, SOG, et al, are much more versatile than the Swiss Army Knife and their prices are comparable to the more expensive Swiss Army Knives. In the meantime, I will hang on to my SAK until I can afford a Leatherman Super Tool. (I still have a house to run.)

50. 200′ to 500′ of 550# test Paracord is a great addition to your supplies, especially when the 1/4″ nylon cord/rope is too thick or not the right tool for the job.